Jeremy Keith

Jeremy Keith lives in Brighton, England where he makes websites with the splendid design agency Clearleft. You may know him from such books as DOM Scripting: JavaScript’s New Hope, Bulletproof Ajax: The Browser Strikes Back, and HTML5 For Web Designers: Return Of The Standards.

He’s the curator of the dConstruct conference as well as Brighton SF, and he organised the world’s first Science Hack Day. He also made the website Huffduffer to allow people to make podcasts of found sounds—it’s like Instapaper for audio files.


Episode 110 Understanding the Web

The web is being compared to "native" a lot these days, with some even declaring the web dead. But what are the strengths web? What does it do that native can't touch? What is it we are making when we are creating something of the web? Jeremy Keith joins Jen Simmons to articulate how to understand and appreciate the web.

In This Episode

  • The qualities of the web that make it great
  • Web vs. Native
  • The web compared to CD-ROMs, Flash and print
  • How we get stuck, not expecting things to change
  • How today's choice of a tool creates tomorrow's technical debt
  • The value of 'boring' blog posts
  • The problem of self-censorship
  • Ideas for wrangling the inner critic
  • The opportunities the web has given us

Episode 73 DRM

DRM has been long touted as the solution to piracy. Recently, a few browser makers and big media companies have pushed DRM technology into the web browser — while open web advocates have fought to prevent DRM on the web. What is DRM? Why and how are companies putting it into web browsers? And what solutions would be better? Jeremy Keith and Doug Schepers join Jen Simmons to debate DRM on the web.

Episode 56 The Nature of the Web

Wonder-developer Jeremy Keith joins Jen Simmons to debate comments on websites, the birth of the web, progressive enhancement, the desire for control, and much more.

Episode 3 Everything Web

Jeremy Keith joins Jen to talk about Mobilewood, future-friendlying websites, responsive design techniques, digital preservation, HTML5 semantics, Firefox 7, and much more.